These Brands We Love Might Be Disappearing

It’s never the right time to say goodbye. While we usually say that to someone going through a breakup, nostalgic products also warrant a moment of reflection on the changes that come all too soon. How great does it feel to see your favorite childhood food on the shelf at the store, snickering at the fact your mom actually let you eat that stuff?

In the information age, everything gets challenged, including our most beloved stores and products. Here are some of the most lovable products facing extinction.

Campbell’s Can’t Keep Up

GettyImages-73534120
L. Willinger/FPG/Getty Images
L. Willinger/FPG/Getty Images

Nutrition fads exploded in the 20th century, and just keep rising along with obesity rates. Hidden Profits Marketing shows that between 30-40% of all adults in America were obese in 2018. With heightened awareness comes heightened standards for food.

Campbell’s soup may be a staple of pop culture, but it’s rapidly losing its spot in kitchen pantries. It’s not surprising when you look at the nutrition facts. Compared to Amy’s version, Campbell’s Chicken Noodle Soup has more than double the sodium, 69% your daily value, 30 more calories and 6 more grams of carbohydrates. That’s unsettling.

Fabric Softeners Are Hard On Our Insides

GettyImages-540183077
Fairfax Media via Getty Images
Fairfax Media via Getty Images

As cancer continues to be one of the most heartbreaking modern epidemics, it has caused the public to turn a skeptical eye at the products in their homes. Unfortunately for fabric softener brands, they no longer pass the safety test. According to Ackerman Cancer Center, fabric softener coats clothes with many harmful chemicals that have been linked to asthma, pancreatic cancer, and respiratory and nervous system damage.

Sales of fabric softeners have dropped 15% in the past decade, suggesting that buyers would rather not risk the adverse health effects. Instead, consumers are opting for safer and cheaper alternatives, like white distilled vinegar.

The Gluten-Free Craze is Hurting Wheaties Cereal

GettyImages-469935608
Burhaan Kinu/Hindustan Times via Getty Images
Burhaan Kinu/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Few foods have seen more public pushback than wheat. Talk about whiplash! Wheat used to be one of the biggest staples in the American diet, preached as a healthy alternative to most other starches. Then, the gluten-free phenomenon entered.

Forbes reports that 300% more Americans are gluten-free than they were in 2009, three-quarters of which have not been diagnosed with celiac disease. Even so, strong testimonials have convinced the general public to at least give it a try, especially with the low carb diet back in full swing. This is bad news for Wheaties, an iconic cereal we’re seeing less and less of on the shelves.

People Aren’t Buying The Chevrolet Cruze Anymore

GettyImages-91775069
PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/Getty Images
PRAKASH SINGH/AFP/Getty Images

Now that crossover cars are becoming increasingly more popular, sedans are being phased out. More automakers are recognizing that customers find crossover vehicles better suit their needs. And when it’s time to get another vehicle, 66.9 percent of U.S. households that currently own a crossover say they plan on buying another, according to CNBC.

One of the sedan models taking the hit is the Chevy Cruze, which is seeing sales down 28 percent. Chevrolet, noting the decline in sales, is making the necessary adjustments, which means that 1,500 workers might be impacted.

It’s The End Of The Line For The Volkswagon Beetle

the-last-vw-beetle-174194348-45255
ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images
ALEXANDER KLEIN/AFP/Getty Images

The Volkswagen Beetle was first introduced to the United States in 1949, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that it became the hottest car to drive. In 1970, 570,000 Beetles were sold, and sales surpassed the Ford Model T, making the Beetle the world’s best-selling car.

Three different models of the Beetle were introduced over the decades, and finally, in 2019, VW announced that the last Type 3 Beetle rolled off the production line, and they would no longer be making the beloved Bug.

Tiffany & Co. Might Be Too Much Of A Strong, Independent Woman

GettyImages-461436260
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Bet you didn’t know that the iconic jewelry brand was named after a man, NOT a woman. Let’s go way back in time, to 1837, when Charles Lewis Tiffany started a fancy goods store in New York City. Women flocked to buy then-contemporary pieces of jewelry. Clean rather than gaudy, the jewelry set the standard for pure silver, 92% pure to be exact.

Fast-forward almost 200 years, and the company’s stocks have dropped 20%. Millennials just love their cheap jewelry. But with new management to help rebrand, the company hopes shoppers will see the value in their luxury jewelry.

Say Au Revoir To Chef Boyardee

GettyImages-874205102
Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images
Tim Clayton/Corbis via Getty Images

Unless your parents were one of those health gurus, you had Chef Boyardee at some point in your childhood. The famous canned pasta was a parent go-to and child favorite. The downside is that the idea of a meal in a can is no longer a sales pitch.

While Statista shows that the market of ready meals is expected to increase 2% annually in the U.S., meal box subscriptions make it easier than ever to have a ready meal that’s also a healthy meal. Statista shows that the revenue of meal kits is expected to have increased ten-fold in 2020 since 2015.

Diet Pepsi is Fizzling Out

GettyImages-810714
Pepsi/Getty Images
Pepsi/Getty Images

Soda water companies have managed to soothe the cravings of soda lovers without the cost of fake sugar. Sugar substitutions have faced scrutiny for the past few years with critics going as far as saying they may cause cancer. While more recent studies have shown this correlation to actually be a myth, such suggestions recall the famous phrase “if it’s too good to be true, it is.”

Mayo Clinic says that while artificial sweeteners are safe to consume, moderation is the key. As such, diet sodas have become the very treat they sought to replace, pushing Diet Pepsi further down the beverage ladder.

Budweiser Doesn’t Quite Stack Up To Newer Options

GettyImages-162799441
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

For decades Budweiser and Bud Light have topped the charts for bestselling beers in America. However, its sales have inched down in the past couple of years. The trend is likely to continue since millennials are all now of drinking age, but seeking out alternatives.

According to USA Today, millennials are less infatuated with beer than older generations, consuming more wine and cocktails than beer. One reason for this may be that stores now offer various alcoholic beverages, such as hard seltzer and hard lemonade. If the beer brands keep getting substituted for their fruity alternatives, they just might get canned.

Who Needs Costco Wholesale?

GettyImages-756618
Tim Boyle/Getty Images
Tim Boyle/Getty Images

The New York Times published an article in 2018 that unmasks a surprising discovery: Americans aren’t having as many kids. The fertility rate hit an all-time low for two consecutive years, causing researchers to ask themselves if millennials may be a more unique generation than we initially realized.

As careers, financial security, and personal freedom increase, the need for buy-in-bulk supermarkets is decreasing. This is bad news for Costco, a company that seems to have gotten their business model from 19 Kids And Counting. Plus, if young people have more money they’ll be less desperate for those famous free samples.

Kenmore Might Have Some Chilling News

GettyImages-819851652
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

What Kenmore is to Sears was like cheese to mac n cheese. It was the ingredient that made the whole thing work. The shock of a huge company like Sears going belly up has left all stores facing technological takeover. But what about the products within the stores?

With access to any number of brands for a given product, conveniently placed alongside all of the specs and pricing information, buyers can now select their appliances based on their specific needs. Kenmore appliances may have appeared in most kitchens long ago, but that was when Sears was the go-to store.

Department Stores Are Departing

GettyImages-588424934
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Department stores are the buffet of product shopping. If a woman has a last-minute obligation and nothing to wear, boom! Jewelry, perfume, outfit, shoes are found and purchased in one spot. Best of all, you can find something for the entire family without having to see the light of day, making department stores a Christmas season staple.

That is until the internet revolutionized shopping. Statista projected in 2017 that in 2021 230.5 million Americans will shop online, which is about 70%. Research suggests we may have already crushed that number in 2019, leaving department stores an empty, expired fad.

To Eat Old Country Buffet, You’re Going To Have To Travel Out To The Old Country

GettyImages-477668195
Alex Wong/Getty Images
Alex Wong/Getty Images

So many buffets, so little time. That’s how it was at the turn of the 21st century with restaurants like Sizzler, Souplantation, and Hometown Buffet at every turn. But the buffet craze is fading away. With companies like Door Dash and Uber Eats, the thrill of easy access to varied food choices is becoming blasé.

It’s no surprise then that Old Country Buffet closed down several of its locations in the past few years. Only about 20 branches remain open and are often the only location in the entire state.

SlimFast Is Dropping Value Fast

GettyImages-129403026
Charley Gallay/WireImage
Charley Gallay/WireImage

Dieting has evolved so much over the years, always coming back to the same final message that eating right and exercise is really the best way to lose weight. But sometimes people want a quicker solution that won’t break the bank. SlimFast used to be that option.

But not anymore. In 2000 the company sold for over $2 billion. Last year, it sold for $350 million. That’s nearly a 20% decrease in market value over the course of two decades. It’s easy to recognize that the price is going the wrong direction: down and off our shelves.

Kodak Is Struggling To Make A Coin

GettyImages-590637707
Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Kodak, the king of disposable cameras. You can still hear the nostalgic sound of winding the film before your next shot and can still feel the burning curiosity of what photos you would be handed when you picked them up from the store. And let’s not forget the old wedding trick of turning every guest into a personal photographer with these bad boys.

But then they sold their patents, the value of which was probably eaten in one bite by cellphones. So, Kodak came up with KodakCoin, a way for photographs to get due currency for their photos. It just hasn’t taken off yet.

Claire’s May Have Run Out Of Ears To Pierce

claires-stores
John Keeble/Getty Images
John Keeble/Getty Images

The place that pierced over 100 million ears declared bankruptcy last year. After dropping in stock, Claire’s stores didn’t have more to give. The junior Forever 21, Claire’s offers dazzling accessories that range from hairpieces to purses and wallets to tutus.

Perhaps the most heartbreaking is the store’s theme of friendship found in many of its products. Friendship bracelets, missing piece necklaces, and other matching accessories are as much a part of this store’s decor as the purple tags and rainbow sequins. Even if they do go under, they’ll still be the BFF of girls who grew up in their stores.

Harley Davidson Is No Longer The Cool Kid

GettyImages-1155464857
ROMAIN LAFABREGUE/AFP/Getty Images
ROMAIN LAFABREGUE/AFP/Getty Images

Motorcycles used to represent ideas of rebellion, freedom, nonconformity, and independence. While this still may be true to an extent, it just doesn’t phase younger generations the way it did their parents. Modern “cool” has less to do with loud motors and skull tattoos, and more to do with health and environmental consciousness.

As a result, researchers predict sales will continue to drop while electric scooters and bicycles rise. Plus, Uber and Lyft have made it easier than ever to get around, especially in when drinking is involved.

Crocs Might Croak

GettyImages-71292822
David Silverman/Getty Images
David Silverman/Getty Images

When Crocs first hit the market, no one could have predicted that these shoes would become so… their own style. The fashion debate only increased their popularity as celebrities started sporting the footwear along with moms on the go, toddlers, and young adults. Before long, everyone who didn’t hate them had them.

For those who do hate the shoes, get ready to give a big told-you-so. 180 Croc stores were announced to be closing in 2018. In an attempt to save their sales, Crocs is rolling out some new styles. But if we’ve learned anything it’s that they’ll be hit or miss.

The iPod Will Never Be The Same

GettyImages-88691054
Michal Czerwonka/Getty Images
Michal Czerwonka/Getty Images

The iPod revolutionized transportable music players. When CD players were replaced by mp3 players, buyers didn’t seem to know what direction to go. Apple essentially took them by the hand and led them straight to the iPod.

Every kid on the bus had an iPod to drain out the loud kids with the gentle click of scrolling through their favorite songs. However, the iPod ended up becoming overtaken by its very own iPhone as smartphones started offering a wider range of music. Today, the iPod nano and shuffle are no more.

The Fiat Is Returning To Its Birthplace

fait-dying-trend-1055569718
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images
Sjoerd van der Wal/Getty Images

The Fiat became a popular car in America thanks to its stylish look and compact composition. Unfortunately, its classy design could only go so far in the states, with Americans having a higher tendency to buy large and practical cars.

The Italian-made car will continue its sales in Europe. However, our “the bigger, the better” attitude made Fiat inclined to remove itself from U.S. markets almost entirely. Although the company did come out with an SUV, theirs struggled to keep up with well-established SUV brands.