The Stunning Tiaras of the Swedish Royal Family

It’s no secret that royal families like pretty, shiny, expensive things. Opulence and grandeur is what it’s all about – and the love of the good common folk, of course. The Swedish Royal family often fall second to the never-ending media circus that surrounds their British equivalent, but that doesn’t change the fact that they came to drip.

State dinners, weddings, banquets – they’re all only complete when one has a sparkling diamond tiara on one’s head. Join us as we take a look at some of the most beautiful pieces tucked away in the family vault.

The Baden Fringe

Baden Fringe Tiara
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage

When it comes to tiaras, Crown Princess Victoria has a personal favorite. The brunette beauty has been spotted wearing the famous 19th century Baden Fringe Tiara on many occasions. In 1881, Princess Victoria of Baden received the beautiful piece from her parents.

Made up of diamond sunray motifs, the tiara can be detached from its frame and worn as a necklace. While many other members of the family have worn the Baden Fringe over the years, Victoria has been its primary owner for the last 15 years. In fact, when a Barbie doll was made in her image, it even had its very own version!

Connaught "Forget-Me-Not" Tiara

Forget Me Not
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

What’s better than diamonds and flowers? This utterly stunning eye catcher goes by the name of the Connaught “Forget-Me-Not”. It was made by E. Wolff & Co. in 1905, for the wedding of Princess Margaret of Connaught. Her parents gifted her the impressive headbands, which features diamond-encrusted wreaths of forget-me-nots.

The diamond pendants can be taken off to be worn as a necklace, which Princess Madeleine does frequently. Like some other favorite tiaras among Sweden’s royalty, it can be deconstructed and worn as an entire necklace, although this doesn’t happen often. Presumably it’s just too expensive to be messed with!

The Braganza

Braganca
Photo by Alain BENAINOUS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Photo by Alain BENAINOUS/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Queen Silvia isn’t one for shying away from the jewel cabinet. In fact, the more she can pack on at one time, the better. Some members of the family tend to shy away from the larger pieces, but Queen Silvia loves them.

In particular, she’s a fan of the Braganza, a five-inch tall heritage piece handed down through the generations. It originally belonged to Queen Josephine’s sister, Empress Amelie of Brazil. Clearly, expensive taste runs in the family. The swirling, intricate patterns and sheer size of the Braganza make it one of the most treasured tiaras in the vault.

Princess Sofia’s Wedding Tiara

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Photo by JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images
Photo by JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images

When she married into the Swedish royal family in 2015, Sofia was a model. Much like Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle, she was considered a “commoner”. However, her in-laws King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia didn’t seem to mind.

They gifted her this stunning tiara, which originally had emeralds in it. Pictured here at the 2017 Nobel Prize Award ceremony, Princess Sofia opted to switch the emeralds out for pearls. The Art Deco-inspired piece certainly glows, just like its owner!

Leuchtenberg Sapphire Tiara

Queen Silvia
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images

The Leuchtenberg Sapphire Tiara has some impressive history to go with it. Napoleon gifted it to his step-daughter-in-law, Princess Augusta of Bavaria, Duchess of Leuchtenberg. Augusta passed it down to her daughter, Queen Josefina and it has been worn by all Queens of Sweden since Victora.

While it’s graced the heads of many royals in the past, these days it’s reserved solely for use by Queen Silvia. Her Majesty typically wears the stunning sapphire encrusted band to the Nobel Prize Awards. It’s widely recognized as one of her favorite tiaras, thanks in part to its flexibility which makes it easy to transport.

Queen Sofia’s 9-Prong Tiara

9-Prong Tiara
Photo credit should read Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images
Photo credit should read Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images

It’s not always easy wearing a tiara. In fact, some of them can be so uncomfortable that it’s tempting to leave them in the vault never to be seen again. However, when they’re this beautiful, it would be a crime to not be photographed wearing it.

This 9-pronged tiara belonged to Queen Sofia and has subsequently made its way from Queen to Queen ever since. Queen Silvia wears it to special events, although reportedly doesn’t like how stiff and inflexible it is. It has been lent to the King’s sisters and aunt, Princess Lillian in the past, too. More often than not, it makes an appearance at Nobel Prizes and grand banquets.

Napoleonic Amethyst Tiara

Amethyst
Michel Porro/Getty Images
Michel Porro/Getty Images

Unlike many tiaras that can be turned into necklaces, the Napoleonic Amethyst Tiara started out as a necklace. It belonged to the famous Empress Josephine of France. Beautiful amethyst stones are cased in diamonds, making it a particularly heavy piece. Queen Silvia turned it into a tiara not long after her marriage.

Most of the Royal women have worn it at some point, including Crown Princess Victoria, Princess Madeleine, and Princess Sofia. Unlike some of the other pieces we’ve mentioned, the Napoleonic Amethyst Tiara isn’t particularly favored by one Royal over the rest, perhaps due to its sheer weight.

The Cameo Tiara

Cameo Tiara
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

Not every tiara in the collection is dripping with diamonds. The Cameo Tiara has the distinction of being the oldest tiara in the vault. Napoleon gave the stunning pearl and gold piece to Empress Josephine of France around 1809. It then fell into the hands of her granddaughter, Queen Josefina of Sweden.

It enjoyed a brief stint outside of the main royal family before being loaned to Crown Princess Margaret of Sweden. She, in turn, left it to her daughter-in-law Princess Sibylla. Queen Silvia wore it to her own wedding in 1976, while Crown Princess Victoria wore it at her wedding in 2010.

The Laurel Wreath Tiara

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Photo by Danny Martindale/WireImage
Photo by Danny Martindale/WireImage

The Laurel Wreath Tiara was another wedding gift, this time for Princess Margaret of Connaught. The Princess wore the two-tiered diamond headband for her wedding to Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf in 1905 after it was gifted to her by her husband’s grandmother, Queen Sofia. When she died young in 1920, it was left to her son, Prince Bertil.

Bertil’s wife, Lillian Craig, wore it to her own wedding before leaving it to Princess Victoria when she passed away in 2013. The Princess has worn it several times, including the the wedding banquet of Princess Madeleine, as pictured above.

Napoleonic Cut-Steel Tiara

Napoleonic Steel Cut Tiara
Photo credit should read SOREN ANDERSSON/AFP/Getty Images
Photo credit should read SOREN ANDERSSON/AFP/Getty Images

Who needs a crown when you’ve got something this beautiful to slip on? The Napoleonic Cut-Steel Tiara could tell some stories. Its history is as rich as the family it belongs to. Queen Silvia found the tiara by chance, when she was sorting through the cupboards of the palace after her marriage.

Originally made for Queen Hortense of Holland, the steel and diamond tiara was brought back to Sweden by her niece, Queen Josefina. The King’s sisters have also worn it at certain points, but it remains a favorite of Crown Princess Victoria. As it’s less heavily adorned with jewels and diamonds than some of its contemporaries, it’s easier to wear.

The Modern Fringe

Princess Madeleine Wedding
Photo by Luca Teuchmann/WireImage
Photo by Luca Teuchmann/WireImage

Most of us can hope to get a Target gift card for our wedding day, or maybe a sentimental old brooch. Customs are a little different for the Swedish Royals, who traditionally give diamond tiaras. The Modern Fringe was given to Queen Silvia by her husband, King Carl XVI Gustaf in the ’80s.

Queen Silvia adored the tiara, wearing it more frequently than most of her other pieces. Princess Madeleine started wearing it more frequently in recent years, even donning it at her wedding in 2013. It was then officially announced that the Modern Fringe had been gifted to the Princess for her big day.

The Aquamarine Kokoshnik

Aquamarine Tiara
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage

Possibly one of the most breathtakingly unique items in the collection, the Aquamarine Kokoshnik is a jaw-dropping piece. Gifted to Crown Princess Margaret to her son on her passing, it fell to Princess Margretha in 1964. Her eldest daughter wore it at her 1998 wedding, but after that, it seemingly disappeared.

No one wore the tiara for years until it reappeared again in 2010 when Princess Margretha wore it to Crown Princess Victoria’s wedding. Since then, the Aquamarine Kokoshnik has seen the light of day several times, with both Princess Christina and Princess Madeleine making good use of it.

The History Behind Princess Sofia’s Tiara

Princess Sofia Wedding Day
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images

She may have been a “commoner” when she married Prince Carl in 2015, but Sofia knows how to rock a tiara. Given to her by Queen Silvia and King Carl XVI Gustaf when she tied the knot, this stunning diamond tiara with emerald points was originally a necklace.

Reportedly, the necklace was a gift to Queen Silvia from a Thai prince, but it was converted into a tiara. Princess Sofia wore the tiara to many of her early events as a Royal, but has since branched out. The tiara hasn’t been seen in quite some time, but is sure to make a triumphant comeback at some stage.

The Cut-Steel Bandeau

Cut-Steel Bandeau
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage
Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/WireImage

This understated, elegant piece comes from the same collection as the Napoleonic Cut-Steel Tiara. The Cut-Steel Bandeau is perfect for special events, while also looking refined. The item was first seen fairly recently when Crown Princess Victoria wore it in 2012.

Since then, it’s resurfaced a few times. Princess Sofia wore it to the 2016 Nobel Prize Ceremony, and again the following year to a state dinner. Although it isn’t a popular tiara among the Royals (who tend to go for bold, diamond-encrusted pieces) it’s a strong addition to the collection that works exceedingly well with Sofia’s fair complexion and dark hair.

Edward VII Ruby Tiara

Edward VII Ruby Tiara
Photo by Antony Jones/Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images
Photo by Antony Jones/Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images

Margaret of Connaught was an extremely lucky bride. Her aunt and uncle, King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra of the United Kingdom sent across this ruby tiara with a matching necklace. It was left to her son, Prince Sigvard, who sold it to his father after losing his title for marrying a commoner.

There was some family disagreement over who should be the rightful owner of the tiara, even after King Carl XVI Gustaf bought it. The piece was then kept out of public view for many years until Queen Silvia started wearing it again in the late ’00s. The towering tiara makes a powerful statement but isn’t often worn these days.

The Four-Button Tiara

Four-Button Tiara
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images

The Four-Button Tiara looks quintessentially ’60s…and that’s because it is. It was commissioned by King Carl XVI Gustaf to be worn by his four sisters – hence the number of diamond flowers. Although typically used by the minor members of the household, it sometimes gets a big mention.

Crown Princess Victoria has been spotted wearing it several times, as has Princess Sofia. The statement piece goes a long way, catching the light beautifully and popping in pictures. Considering its history, it’s probably a sentimental item in the collection for the King and his family who remain a tight unit. All five siblings are still living.

Princess Desiree’s Tiara

Princess Desiree
Photo by Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images
Photo by Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

It’s all about who you know in the tiara business. As we’ve seen, these pieces get handed down from generation to generation. Queen Louise wore this Art Deco-inspired tiara in the ’20s and ’30s, before passing it on to the Haga Princesses, who wore it in the ’50s and ’60s.

Queen Louise then gifted the tiara to Princess Desiree, sister of current King Carl XVI Gustaf, for her wedding to Baron Sifverschiold. The Princess doesn’t wear it often. In fact, out of all the Swedish tiaras, it’s possibly the most seldom seen. She did break it out three years ago for her brother’s 70th birthday celebrations, though.

Princess Christina’s Tiara

Princess Christina
Photo by Jerry Engel/New York Post Archives /(c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images
Photo by Jerry Engel/New York Post Archives /(c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images

Elsa Cedergren was given this sweet pointed tiara by her grandmother, Queen Sophia. Elsa than handed it down to her goddaughter, Princess Christina as a coming-of-age 18th birthday present. Princess Christina adored the tiara and wore it frequently until it was stolen.

Thieves managed to get hold of the precious item during a robbery in 2012. Sadly, it was a friend of the family that committed the crime. The perpetrator sold different items of jewelry before throwing the invaluable diamond and pearl tiara into the Stockholm River. Despite attempts to find it, it has never been retrieved.

The Six-Button Tiara

Six-Button Tiara
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images
Photo by Julian Parker/UK Press via Getty Images

This showstopper supposedly contains six of the buttons that adorned the crown of King Carl XIV at his 1818 coronation. The beautiful tiara was allegedly commissioned for Princess Lilian but was also worn by other members of the family.

Crown Princess Victoria and her sister, Princess Madeline have also worn the Six-Button to various events. Princess Christina frequently donned it after the theft of her own tiara. Considering the thick band and the two heavy layers of diamonds, followed by the six round buttons, it can’t be a particularly easy thing to wear, especially for long banquets and state dinners.

Princess Madeleine’s Aquamarine Band

Aquamarine Band
Photo by Pool BASSIGNAC/BUU/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Photo by Pool BASSIGNAC/BUU/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Little is known about this understated and simple tiara that Princess Madeleine wore to a family wedding in 2002. Standing next to her brother, the young Princess matched her tiara to her dress. Pictures of it before or since seem to be non-existent, suggesting it’s not a particularly important tiara.

With just one aquamarine stone set in the center, this tiara is more like a headband than the others we have seen. Perhaps unwilling to upstage the bride on her big day, Princess Madeleine could’ve commissioned the item for a single-use purpose only. While pretty in its own way, it lacks the grandeur of others we’ve seen.

Princess Martha’s Vasa Tiara

Princess Martha of Sweden wearing the Vasa Tiara
Pinterest/Prapai Forsgren
Pinterest/Prapai Forsgren

In 1929, Princess Martha of Sweden married Prince Olav of Norway. Press from all over the world took note of the wedding in Stockholm, Sweden. According to the Windsor Star, a Canadian newspaper, the city of Stockholm gave Princess Martha a special gift: the Vasa Tiara.

C.F. Carlman made this platinum and diamond tiara specifically for the Swedish royal family. The Vasa’s design represents the House of Vasa dynasty that descended from Sweden and Poland. It has 956 brilliants and weights 49.5 carats. The white and blue-white solitaires give the crown a shine that matched Martha’s pearls and wedding dress.

The Small But Breathtaking Pearl Circle Tiara

Desiree von Bohlen und Halbach and Eckbert von Bohlen attend the wedding of Princess Madeleine of Sweden and Christopher O'Neill
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

This lesser-known tiara has a long history among Swedish royalty, beginning with Princess Birgitta. In 1960, the famed Haga Princess announced her engagement to Prince Johann Georg of Hohenzollern, Germany. For the wedding, King Gustaf VI Adolf and Queen Louise gifted Birgitta with the Pearl Circle Tiara.

The tiara features seven pearl circles, each with a pearl-and-diamond flower in the center. Like other royal crowns, this beauty was made by C.F. Carlman. Princess Birgitta has passed the pearl circle on to other royal family members, such as her daughter, Princess Désirée, and Princess Madeleine of Sweden.

Countess Marianne’s Diamond And Pearl Tiara

Countess Marianne Bernadotte of Wisborg attends the royal wedding of Prince Carl Philip of Sweden
Ian Gavan/Getty Images
Ian Gavan/Getty Images

The Princess of Bernadotte, Countess Marianne Bernadotte of Wisborg, is the last surviving aunt of King Carl XVI Gustaf. She’s a beloved family member to the Swedish royals and attends most of their events. As such, her iconic diamond and pearl tiara deserves a mention.

Unlike other royal tiaras, Countess Marianne’s crown was her personal property and not a passed-down heirloom. That didn’t stop her from wearing her crown to the wedding of Princess Victoria, the wedding of Prince Carl Philip, and the Nobel Prize Banquet. Marianne reportedly received the diamond and pearl headpiece from her mother-in-law for her wedding in 1961.

The Lily Of The Valley Tiara

Countess Gunnila Bernadotte and her lily of the valley tiara
Pinterest/Prapai Forsgren
Pinterest/Prapai Forsgren

This unique gem belonged to Countess Gunnila Bernadotte of Wisborg, aunt to King Carl XVI. Before she died in September of 2016, Gunnila wore this tiara to the weddings of Princess Madeleine, Princess Victoria, and Prince Frederik of Denmark. It is believed that Gunnila’s mother, Marta Wachtmeister af Johannishus, passed down the crown to her daughter.

The platinum, diamond, and cultured pearl-tiara forms a striking lily of the valley shape. It can also be taken apart and worn as a brooch, which Countess Gunnila took advantage of several times. After her death, the tiara was auctioned for $38,000 USD.

Queen Josephine’s Diamond Tiara

Queen Sonja of Norway attends a dinner at the Guildhall in England
Tim Graham Photo Library via Getty Images
Tim Graham Photo Library via Getty Images

Queen Josephine married King Oscar I and ruled during the 1840s and 1850s. She passed down her enormous, decadent crown to Princess Louise, who eventually became Queen of Denmark. Queen Louise then gave it to her granddaughter, Queen Märtha of Norway. Although the tiara remains with the Norwegian monarchy, it is a Swedish jewel through heritage.

The diamond tiara features a diadem of floral and laurel designs weaving throughout the crown, plated in silver and gold. The crown itself stems from the Napoleonic era: it was made for Empress Josephine, wife of Napoleon and Queen Josephine’s grandmother.

How does Sweden’s royal family jewel collection compare to the British royal family? You’re about to find out.

Princess Di’s Sapphire Engagement Ring

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Pool Photograph/Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images
Pool Photograph/Corbis/Corbis via Getty Images

We all know the famous engagement ring formerly worn by Princess, Diana which now lives on Kate Middleton’s elegant finger. But did you know there was quite a bit of controversy around it within the royal family? When Diana picked the sapphire creation out of a Garrad catalog, some members of the family poo-pooed it because it wasn’t custom-made. For a member of royalty to pick a ring that was accessible to the common public was unheard of.

The unique ring that’s inspired copycats around the world features a 12-carat oval Ceylon sapphire that’s surrounded by 14 solitaire diamonds and set in 18-karat white gold.

Reinventing the Brooch

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Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images
Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

Queen Elizabeth loaned Queen Mary’s Bandeau Tiara for Meghan Markle to wear at her wedding to Prince Harry. In true fairytale fashion, Meghan got to enter her Majesty the Queen’s vault and have her pick of stunning tiaras.

In 1932 Queen Mary had the Bandeau Tiara made specifically to accommodate the centerpiece stone, which is actually a brooch. The brooch was given to Mary of Teck in 1893 as a gift from the Country of Lincoln on the occasion of her wedding to then-Prince George, Duke of York.

Ouch! This coronation ring was forced onto Victoria’s finger

The Coronation Ring That Didn’t Fit

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Pinterest/The Telegraph
Pinterest/The Telegraph

Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, the goldsmiths who made this ring of sapphire, rubies, and gold, screwed up royally in 1838. Apparently, the jewelers misunderstood the wording of the rubric given to them for the coronation and made this ring for Queen Victoria’s little finger, not the ring finger. Whoops!

Come ceremony time, the Archbishop forced it on her ring finger anyway. Queen Victoria had to soak her hand in ice water after the ceremony in order to get it off.

Next: rubies galore

Another Example Of The Repurposing Trend

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John Shelley Collection/Avalon/Getty Images
John Shelley Collection/Avalon/Getty Images

Taking a page from Queen Mary and her mother, Queen Elizabeth II had this tiara made from gems she received as presents from the People of Burma for her wedding to Prince Philip. In 1973 she commissioned House of Garrard to create the Burmese Ruby tiara out of rubies and diamonds from a dismantled tiara given to her by the Nizam of Hyderabad.

The Burmese Ruby tiara features multiple Tudor rose designs and totals 96 rubies. The Burmese people believe that rubies help protect the wearer from the 96 diseases that can afflict the human body.

Royal Honeycomb

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Mega Photos
Mega Photos

This honeycomb-style tiara was a favorite of the late Queen Mother’s and is a favorite of the Duchess of Cornwall’s today. With no heirs of her own, it was bequeathed to the Queen Mother by wealthy socialite and brewery heiress Margaret Greville in 2002, along with all her other rare jewels.

Made by Boucheron, it’s one of the sparkliest tiaras in the royal collection. The Queen Mother upped the bling on this tiara and had it made even larger, asking Cartier to add a marquise-shaped diamond in the center.

Meghan Markle’s Engagement Ring Holds Special Meaning For Prince Harry

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Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images
Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

Talk about romantic! Prince Harry designed the engagement ring he proposed to Meghan Markle with. The completely unique piece was custom-made by the famed jeweler British Cleave & Co. for Harry.

It features a three-carat cushion-cut diamond from Botswana, which is a country dear to the couple. Set in a yellow gold band, the diamond side stones were given to Harry by his mother, the late Princess Diana. How very touching.

See how the couple modified Meghan’s ring to give it a new look in 2019 next.

After Her Son’s Birth, Meghan Shows Off A New Style

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WPA Pool/Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images
WPA Pool/Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images

After her newborn son’s birth, Meghan took some much-needed time away from the spotlight and social obligations. When the Duchess reemerged in June 2019, photographers snapped photos of her hand, which appeared to have an upgraded version of her engagement ring, as well as a new ring, rumored to be either a push present from Harry, or an anniversary gift.

Her engagement ring’s band was redesigned to a more minimal style, which in turn makes the three diamonds look a lot bigger. The diamonds and the settings remain the same, as Harry originally selected for his wife-to-be.

O Canada! What A Gift!

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Pool/Sam Hussein/WireImage
Pool/Sam Hussein/WireImage

King George VI bought this Canadian maple leaf brooch for Queen Elizabeth during their first state visit to Canada in 1939. The brooch was bequeathed to Queen Elizabeth II after Queen Elizabeth’s passing in 2002.

The Canadian maple leaf brooch is one of the most loaned-out pieces of jewelry in the Queen’s collection. Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, have both worn it several times, in addition to Queen Elizabeth II.

Taking The Traditional Silver Anniversary Gift Above And Beyond

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Ron Bell – PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images
Ron Bell – PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images

Queen Alexandra’s kokoshnik tiara (a kokoshnik is a halo-shaped headdress worn by Russian women) was a silver wedding anniversary gift for the Prince and Princess of Wales in 1888. The piece has 488 diamonds set in white and yellow gold. A group of aristocratic women known as the Ladies of Society pooled their resources together to fund the gift of a blinding “blaze of diamonds.”

They must have felt they got their money’s worth, because this piece is a two-in-one! As an added bonus, it’s convertible: the tiara can be taken out of its frame and worn as a fringe necklace. It’s now owned by Queen Elizabeth II.

Every Girl’s Dream 21st Birthday Present

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Pinterest/Wendy Vernon
Pinterest/Wendy Vernon

Princess Margaret’s Persian Turquoise Tiara was given to her by her mother on her 21st birthday along with a matching necklace, pendant earrings, a large square brooch, and several hair pieces. The tiara was created by Garrard in the early 1900s.

This stunning tiara has not been seen in public since Margaret’s death in 2002. There is some speculation about who owns the tiara today. Some think it was inherited by one of Margaret’s children, while others believe it was returned to the royal collection. Wherever it is, here’s hoping this beautiful turquoise tiara makes an appearance again.

The Lover’s Knot Tiara

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Pinterest/morph
Pinterest/morph

The Lover’s Knot tiara, also known as the Cambridge Lover’s Knot, was a favorite of Princess Diana’s and has been worn multiple times by Kate Middleton as well. It was lent to Diana on her wedding day by Queen Elizabeth II and returned after her divorce from Prince Charles.

The gleaming tiara was created for Queen Mary in 1914 by Garrard and was made from pearls and diamonds already owned by the family. Queen Mary was inspired by her grandmother Princess Augusta of Hesse’s tiara and wanted this one made to look just like it.

The next diadem is worn exclusively by queens.

Dia-dang

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Pinterest/People
Pinterest/People

The King George IV State Diadem is worn exclusively by queens even though it was made for a king. King George IV initially ordered the crown from Rundell, Bridge, and Rundell in 1820 and wore it on the way to his coronation (as did Elizabeth on her way to hers). It is constructed of gold, silver, diamonds, and pearls.

Queen Elizabeth II wears this impressive diadem when traveling to and from the State Opening of Parliament at Westminister and for many official portraits.

Let’s Brooch the Subject

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Pinterest/Tavia Tenise Sliffe
Pinterest/Tavia Tenise Sliffe

It’s no secret that Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth just loves a brooch. The Kent Amethyst Brooch is part of a set of amethysts owned by the British royal family. The first owner of the set was Queen Victoria’s mother, the Duchess of Kent. It includes a necklace, a pair of hair combs, a pair of earrings, and three brooches.

Queen Elizabeth wears the brooches most frequently and has only been seen publicly wearing the necklace and earrings once, at a banquet in 1984.

22-Carat Magic

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Pinterest/People
Pinterest/People

Nothing screams ‘royalty’ like a neck covered in gigantic, glistening diamonds. The Coronation Necklace and matching diamond earrings have been worn by every queen since Queen Victoria. The set consists of 25 gigantic diamonds. The teardrop diamond in the center is a whopping 22.48-carat stone known as the Lahore Diamond.

Queen Victoria pulled the Lahore Diamond from a ruby tiara she had and commissioned Gerrard to add it to the necklace. The matching earrings, worn by Queen Elizabeth II in this photo, were also pieces from that tiara.

Ariel Would Probably Rock This Aquamarine Tiara

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Pinterest/morph
Pinterest/morph

Queen Elizabeth ordered Gerrard to create the Brazilian Aquamarine Tiara to match a pair of aquamarine earrings and a necklace she received from Brazil for her coronation.

Over the years, the Brazilians kept gifting Her Majesty with exquisite aquamarine gems and jewelry. As she received them she continuously swapped and added aquamarines to the tiara to make it even grander. This is one of the tiaras the Queen pulls out of the vault to wear the most.

One Of The Largest Diamonds Ever Discovered

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Pinterest/Amanda Garcia
Pinterest/Amanda Garcia

The Imperial State Crown is really something. It was made for the coronation of King George VI in 1937 and is set with 2,868 diamonds, 17 sapphires (the largest being 104 carats), 11 emeralds and 269 pearls upon a purple velvet cap with ermine band.

The largest stone on the crown is called Cullinan II, or the “Second Star of Africa”, and weighs a jaw-dropping 317.4 carats. Traditionally worn by the monarch for his or her coronation, it was adjusted to fit Queen Elizabeth II when she took the throne in 1953.

Next: a (brief) break from diamonds.

The Japanese Pearl Choker

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Pinterest/Robin Stevens
Pinterest/Robin Stevens

Queen Elizabeth II commissioned this choker in the early 1980s using cultured pearls that were a gift from the Japanese government. She has loaned it to Princess Diana for a banquet and to Kate Middleton, Duchess of Cambridge, who paired the necklace with Diana’s pearl and diamond earrings.

The choker consists of four delicate strands of pearls meeting at the center diamond pendant. Fun fact about pearls: Just like snowflakes, no two pearls are exactly alike

The Emerald City of Tiaras

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Pinterest/The Telegraph
Pinterest/The Telegraph

The Greville Emerald Kokoshnik tiara is another piece left by the Queen Mother after she died. It hadn’t been seen in public for almost a century until Queen Elizabeth lent the tiara to Princess Eugenie for her wedding day.

It was made by the Parisian jewelry house Boucheron in 1919 and consists of rose-cut pave diamonds set in platinum and adorned with six emeralds. The largest oval-shaped emerald stone clocks in at 93.7 carats. Like Queen Alexandria’s tiara, this one is in the kokoshnik style popularized by the Russian Imperial Court.

Greville’s Gifts Endure

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Pinterest/Hello Royalty
Pinterest/Hello Royalty

The Greville Ruby Necklace is yet another treasure from the Greville haul. It was made by Boucheron in 1907. Queen Elizabeth II received this necklace as a wedding gift from her parents, King George VI and the Queen Mother.

This diamond and ruby necklace has not been worn in public since the 1980s. Her Majesty took it out of the vault and lent it to the Duchess of Cambridge, who wore it to the Spanish State Banquet at Buckingham Palace in 2017. She paired it with the pictured deep-v soft pink Marchesa gown.

Sapphires Are A Family Favorite

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Zak Hussein/Corbis via Getty Images
Zak Hussein/Corbis via Getty Images

Here we are given the chance to take a peek back through history and see the Queen Mother wearing some of her favorite jewels, known as the diamond and sapphire fringe earrings, in 1986 as she attended a birthday celebration.

On the right, the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton wore the same pair of earrings as she arrived at a gala at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London on October 27, 2015.

Queen Mary’s Diamond Bar Choker/Bracelet

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Getty Images
Getty Images

This sparkling art-deco styled diamond choker was first owned by Queen Mary. After her death in 1953, the piece was not seen in public until the Queen Mother wore if for her 75th birthday portrait. It’s now owned by Queen Elizabeth.

In recent years, Kate Middleton has been spotted more than once wearing it as a bracelet. This photo from June 22 shows Prince William and Kate at a gala dinner benefitting East Anglia’s Children’s Hospices.

Queen Victoria Received This Brooch As A Wedding Gift

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Photo by Pinterest/dakimmer
Photo by Pinterest/dakimmer

This gorgeous sapphire brooch is said to be one of the Queen’s most treasured pieces of jewelry. It was a gift presented to her great-great-grandmother Queen Victoria by her fiance Prince Albert the day before they were wed.

Victoria admired the brooch so much that she wore it many times after her wedding day. Queen Elizabeth also wears it frequently. This photo shows her at a reception for secretaries held at The Queen’s Gallery in 2017.

Generations Have Worn This Necklace

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Photo by Pinterest/tandcmag
Photo by Pinterest/tandcmag

Princess Alexandra of Denmark received this necklace as a gift on the eve of her wedding in 1863. The jewelry is now known as Queen Alexandra’s Wedding Necklace, and it was eventually passed down to the Queen Mother.

Upon her passing in 2002, the necklace became the property of Queen Elizabeth. As we’ve seen time and time again, the queen is generous in lending out her jewels. Here’s Kate Middleton wearing it to an official event in 2018.

Princess Victoria “Disposed” Of This Tiara

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Photo by Pinterest/mimishurrgeddis
Photo by Pinterest/mimishurrgeddis

This tiara, seen atop Queen Alexandra’s head, has not been seen in over a century. Although it’s known as the Rundell Tiara, and there was a jeweler named Rundell, Bridge and Rundell, this piece was actually made by the jeweler Gerrard. It was part of a set that also included earrings, a necklace, and a brooch.

According to a book called In The Queen’s Diamonds by Hugh Roberts, the tiara was bequeathed to Alexandra’s daughter Princess Victoria and was “disposed of by her.”

The Sovereign’s Orb Contains 600 Gems And Pearls

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The Print Collector/Getty Images
The Print Collector/Getty Images

The solid gold piece on the left is called the Sovereign’s Orb, which is part of the royal family’s coronation regalia. It was initially made for the 1661 coronation of Charles II and has been used at all coronations since.

The impressive orb contains more than 600 gems and pearls, including diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, and amethyst. When William and Mary came to the throne as King and Queen in 1689, an orb was made for her as well (seen on the right). Both orbs were placed on Queen Victoria’s coffin during her funeral.